Thermaltake Unveils Toughpower GF A3 Power Supplies with ATX 3.0 Specification and Intel Voltage Regulation Standard

Tsing

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Thermaltake has introduced its latest power supplies in the form of the Toughpower GF A3 Gold series. Available in output capacities of up to 1,200 watts, these PSUs are designed with Intel ATX 3.0 compliance, a native PCIe Gen 5.0 12+4 pin modular interface, and 80 PLUS Gold efficiency, making them fully ready to support the newest-gen hardware, including NVIDIA's GeForce RTX 40 Series graphics cards. The leading PC DIY premium brand for case, cooling, gaming peripherals, and enthusiast memory solutions also noted that its Toughpower GF A3 Gold series meets Intel voltage regulation standards, strengthening power stability and reliability. Thermaltake has confirmed that these PSUs will be available for purchase in April 2023 via its worldwide network of authorized retailers and distributors.

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I wonder why it's so rare for someone to go platinum let alone titanium efficiency.
 
The leading PC DIY premium brand for case, cooling, gaming peripherals, and enthusiast memory solutions
Did they come up with this themselves? I don't think they are anywhere near "leading".
 
Did they come up with this themselves? I don't think they are anywhere near "leading".
Thermaltake had been around quite some time and make some great cases and other cooling things.
 
Thermaltake had been around quite some time and make some great cases and other cooling things.
Yes I'm aware of that. I don't personally look at them first when I'm building. The hardware/cases I have owned from them has always been gimmicky and their build quality is below others. I haven't owned anything from them for probably over 15 years so maybe things have changed. Just my opinion.
 
I wonder why it's so rare for someone to go platinum let alone titanium efficiency.
I was talking with a rep from a different psu maker about this about a month back. It's a market preference thing - in the US, higher efficiency units typically don't sell as well compared to EU where energy is more expensive and there are efficiency related regulations.

Same thing happens with AIOs - certain markets gravitate towards different sized radiators.
 
I would bet the regulations in the EU have more of an influence than choice. I would also bet most people see those 80 gold and whatever, as complete bs, even if its not.
 
I would also bet most people see those 80 gold and whatever, as complete bs, even if its not.
Well I won't argue that efficiency is bad - because it's definitely a good thing.

But I would say the ratings system is mostly advertising bunk. A lot of cheaper PSUs will either print a false claim or just make up a random certification name to back up their claim. And even big name brands - a lot of them we don't see the retail models live up to the certification they print on the box.

But you are right - regulation probably drives this thing more than consumer choice. Consumers fall into two categories on this level or hardware: either they are looking for the least expensive thing they think can get the job done, or they are looking to deck it out in as much bling as they can and cost is largely irrelevant. Neither of those make a great case for better efficiency, except for the few smart consumers who are in the know.
 
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