David_Schroth

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 23, 2019
Messages
639
Points
93
Introduction







Today will again be using our new AIO test platform that is capable of putting out enough heat to make even the devil sweat. We do this to test AIO liquid cooling solutions that are likely to be used with some of today’s most demanding CPUs. So, on the bench today is the ASUS ROG Ryujin 240 liquid CPU water cooler (90RC0030-M0AAY0) which is currently the 240mm AIO cooler entry from ASUS. This is also a ROG branded product so we expect it to also be more of a flagship product than entry-level.



ASUS ROG Ryujin 240 Overview...
Continue reading...
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Space_Ranger

Sort-of-Regular
Joined
May 16, 2019
Messages
226
Points
43
David, did you see the video by GN on AIO Setups and things to avoid?



Air in the system will always travel to the highest portion of the system. Having the inlet/outlet of the radiator in the orientation that you have, will lead to weaker water-flow to the block.
 

Brian_B

FPS Regular
Joined
May 28, 2019
Messages
1,072
Points
113
I've always wondered how AIOs deal with air. I had assumed they just vacuum filled them to eliminate all the air, and the hoses were flexible enough to handle the thermal expansion. Any air that gets in afterwards would have been either from a leak or suspended in the coolant and come out of solution, and would pretty much kill the AIO.

Any air in a closed loop system is bad no matter where it collects - in a pump it will kill the pump, in a line it will kill flow, in a rad it will kill cooling, and anywhere in the flow path and it makes noise. That's half the reason why you have a tank in a custom loop - so the air can collect there and stay out of your lines, pumps, and rads.
 

Space_Ranger

Sort-of-Regular
Joined
May 16, 2019
Messages
226
Points
43
Steve's rational on air though made sense, in that if you place it on portion of the tank where the water migrates from hot to cool, it's the least impactful.
 

David_Schroth

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 23, 2019
Messages
639
Points
93
David, did you see the video by GN on AIO Setups and things to avoid?



Air in the system will always travel to the highest portion of the system. Having the inlet/outlet of the radiator in the orientation that you have, will lead to weaker water-flow to the block.
Yeah.. saw it. Couple of issues with changing the orientation though....

1. Radiator tubes are not long enough on any aio tested so far to flip it over on the current rig.
2. Would have to redo all testing for comparison data across all coolers.

So, maybe when I'm in the market for a new case I'll change it out, but at this point, less than perfect will be the way we have to do it
 

Space_Ranger

Sort-of-Regular
Joined
May 16, 2019
Messages
226
Points
43
Yeah.. saw it. Couple of issues with changing the orientation though....

1. Radiator tubes are not long enough on any aio tested so far to flip it over on the current rig.
2. Would have to redo all testing for comparison data across all coolers.

So, maybe when I'm in the market for a new case I'll change it out, but at this point, less than perfect will be the way we have to do it
Thank you for the explanation! Keep up the great work on the reviews!
 

David_Schroth

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 23, 2019
Messages
639
Points
93
Thank you for the explanation! Keep up the great work on the reviews!
Just flipped through the video a second time. Overall, the main reason we would have issues in the current orientation is more related to bubbles getting sucked into the tubes - it seems to be the "best" of the "wrong" ways to mount it... So that's something, right?
 

Eduardo_Domingot

{NG}Fidel
Staff member
Joined
Jul 11, 2019
Messages
482
Points
43
I cant deny I was looking at this AIO but not impressed. Still saving for full custom WC sigh...
 
Become a Patron!
Top