CORSAIR MP600 M.2 SSD PCIE 4.0

AntiQuark

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My other concern with these drives is longevity. I've killed every Corsair SSD I've ever tested in short order.
I'll be keeping an eye on your tactics lol.
Was there anything that stands out in your opinion?
 

AntiQuark

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I've purchased exactly three SSD's since they first hit mainstream. A pair of first gen PNY XLR8 120GB SSD's and a 950 Pro 256GB. The PNY's have been great. One is still going strong, the other just gave up the ghost a couple weeks ago. The 950 is still going strong, of course.
I forgot about the SM961 256 I bought a few weeks ago. Put one in the server and one in my gaming laptop.
Similarly I bought 3 SSDs in total.

The first was an OCz Vertex which started giving smart errors for bad sectors after just over a year but still worked ok.
So I got a Samsung 840 Pro which now has 52K hours on the clock and has been flawless running almost 24/7 for 6 years.
I since added an 850 Evo 2.5 years ago which has also been flawless unsurprisingly.

The OCz Vertex has been re-purposed for Windows 10 to use my VR kit occasionally. Thats how much I think of Windows 10 lol.
 

Dan_D

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I'll be keeping an eye on your tactics lol.
Was there anything that stands out in your opinion?
Not really. The thing is I handle these drives allot. I also put them under these heat sinks on the motherboards which don't always work well. If they are under a GPU, they get cooked. I also beat on them with RAID 0 testing. I also do secure erases on them frequently. That said, I've never lost Samsung or Intel drives from these procedures. My Samsung's are all fairly new. The Intel drives were either in 2.5" / U.2 or PCIe card format. Prior to that I used Corsair Force GT SSD's and Intel drives. I've killed the Corsair's every time and never lost an Intel drive on the bench.
 

Peter_Brosdahl

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Not really. The thing is I handle these drives allot. I also put them under these heat sinks on the motherboards which don't always work well. If they are under a GPU, they get cooked. I also beat on them with RAID 0 testing. I also do secure erases on them frequently. That said, I've never lost Samsung or Intel drives from these procedures. My Samsung's are all fairly new. The Intel drives were either in 2.5" / U.2 or PCIe card format. Prior to that I used Corsair Force GT SSD's and Intel drives. I've killed the Corsair's every time and never lost an Intel drive on the bench.
I haven't ever used Corsair drives, SSD or Platter, but now you've got me curious. For HDD's I mainly only used WD or Seagate with mixed experiences for both. So far I have used a large variety of SSD's. From Sandisk(3d and dram-less) to Intel, Samsung, Toshiba, and Kingston(came with a laptop).

I've deployed the Sandisk dram-less drives in an enterprise environment when I was able to get them on the cheap right before the price hikes. They're 240GB and I was able to pick them up around $50-70 per, roughly 30, about 3-4 years ago. So far only one has failed and it did so about a year later in an office that was known for major infrastructure issues. Thankfully we moved out of that building. They have a pretty easy life these days being used for basic MS Office work and internet in some ancient SATA II HP workstations. They really did help bring some life back to those workstations though.

The only other SSD I've had fail was a Kingston m.2 that was part of a raid in my MSI Titan laptop. That thing barely made it a year. I immediately replaced both with a pair of Samsung 850's. That laptop is running 2 m.2 RAID 0's. One is Intel and the other are the Samsung 850's. I've also got a pair 512TGB 850 pro's in Raid 0 in the 2600k rig along with a Toshiba OCZ 1TB and Sandisk 3D 120GB. There's Intel SATA III's in two other rigs. Those pro's and Intel drives are pushing 3-5+ years now. They've been awesome. I took a chance on a Sandisk 2TB about 2 years ago and it's been good so far. Granted that you can see most of this info in my signature but this is a little more history on it.

It'll be interesting to see the reviews on these things when they come out.
 

ofacesig

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These will use the E16. From Corsair's site, "Easily fitting into a PCIe 4.0 x4 M.2 slot, the MP600’s NVMe interface and high-density 3D TLC NAND combine with a Phison PS5016-E16 controller to enable a new level of single-drive SSD performance."
It's funny how for years, nobody could touch Intel, then sandforce and samsung started making waves. Now Phison has come up like no one's business and is challenging the big boys. All this, using other people's nand, which makes it all the more impressive to me.

Indeed. PCI-Express 4.0 is only available on X570 motherboards right now leaving no alternatives for getting the most out of a storage solution like Corsair's MP600 drives.

My other concern with these drives is longevity. I've killed every Corsair SSD I've ever tested in short order.
Wow, I don't think I've killed a single SSD yet. Even when I was doing enterprise testing while I was at match. I *thought* I had killed an 840 Pro, but I was able to resurrect it.
 

Peter_Brosdahl

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Sad to say that I've read numerous reviews in the last few days on this one. It seems that large file transfers will hit those nice speeds, at least until the buffer fills, but regular everyday usage is a bit underwhelming to say the least. In fact numerous high end PCIe 3.0 NVMe's actually beat it.

Here's one review from Guru3d and a pretty thorough one at that.
https://www.guru3d.com/articles-pages/corsair-mp600-pcie-4-nvme-ssd-review,1.html

Here's a review from TechPowerUp of a Gigabyte drive using the same controller with similar results.
https://www.techpowerup.com/review/pci-express-4-0-nvme-ssd-test-amd-x570-ryzen-3000/
 

Zarathustra

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My other concern with these drives is longevity. I've killed every Corsair SSD I've ever tested in short order.
This is a concern I would have as well.

That said, it is a Phison E16 based unit, and the Phison E12 units have a pretty strong fan following on the H.

That said, the Phison E12 1TB drives were $97 for the Inland Premium models at Microcenter. At that price I'd risk it. These are priced higher, so I am not sure.
 

Dan_D

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This is a concern I would have as well.

That said, it is a Phison E16 based unit, and the Phison E12 units have a pretty strong fan following on the H.

That said, the Phison E12 1TB drives were $97 for the Inland Premium models at Microcenter. At that price I'd risk it. These are priced higher, so I am not sure.
I took the plunge on the Inland 1TB drive from Microcenter. At that price, why not? So far, so good.
 

Zarathustra

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My other concern with these drives is longevity. I've killed every Corsair SSD I've ever tested in short order.
To speak further on this topic, I've owned A LOT of SSD's since I got my first one in early 2010.

I've owned about 6x Intel SSD's an about 14x Samsung SSD's. Of those none have failed.

By contrast, every single OCZ SSD I've owned failed within 2 years time.

This is why I'm inclined to continue choosing Intel or Samsung models, but it looks like maybe they are falling behind in the performance race.

Decisions, decisions.
 

Peter_Brosdahl

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Man it sucks they don't have a Microcenter where I live. Always hearing about the good deals you luck people get at them.
 

Space_Ranger

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1% difference in performance from Gen4 to Gen 3? No thanks.. I'll take my 1TB Inland for $97 and be happy with it still!
 

Zarathustra

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1% difference in performance from Gen4 to Gen 3? No thanks.. I'll take my 1TB Inland for $97 and be happy with it still!
Typical desktop workloads (other than sequential transfers) haven't benefitted much from faster SSD's in the last several generations in my.persona experience.

It's tough to percieve the difference in typical use between even the latest NVMe drives and older SATA SSD's. It's nothing like the gigantic leap going from spinning hard drive Ives to the first SSD's was.

Sequential transfers and high queue depth Enterprise applications being the exceptions of course.
 

Zarathustra

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I too will be picking up one of these Microcenter drives if I build soon.

I'm probably doing the same. I was going to go for a 2TB Gen4 drive and use that for everything, but seeing how much more expensive they are and how little performance improves, I may just pick up a 1TB Inland Premium drive from Microcenter and use it together with my 1TB Samsung 970 EVO, booting off of one in the primary slot, and using the one in the secondary slot for less critical slower stuff, since it is held back by only having two lanes (or one, if I use the 1x PCIe slot)

Question is, which will be faster for boot and OS. The Inland Premium wows us with its sequentials, but I wonder if the 4k Sector size slows down random performance
 

ofacesig

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Question is, which will be faster for boot and OS. The Inland Premium wows us with its sequentials, but I wonder if the 4k Sector size slows down random performance
These are the days I miss Allyn at PcPer. NOBODY knew nand like he did.
 
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