EU Passes New Legislation That Will Require Mobile Device Manufacturers to Have User-Replaceable Batteries by 2027

Peter_Brosdahl

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The EU has been zeroing in on regulations for batteries in mobile devices for some time. Throughout 2022 European regulators made proposals ranging from the banning of glued batteries to requiring manufacturers to include batteries that could hold a full charge for up to five years. Now the former, will in essence become law by 2027 as part of a much broader piece of legislation that was just passed. At that time the new regulations will roll out in phases through 2030.

The new regulations will also place requirements on how much recoverable materials are used in new batteries and suggest that the EU may ban non-rechargeable batteries altogether sometime after 2030.

See full article...
 
I'm all for user-replaceable batteries, but I'm all against regulation that dictates design.

If people really wanted user-replaceable batteries, that's what they would have purchased... manufacturers just make what sells.
 
I'm all for user-replaceable batteries, but I'm all against regulation that dictates design.

If people really wanted user-replaceable batteries, that's what they would have purchased... manufacturers just make what sells.
IF you think manufacturers don't manipulate the market and collude to maximize profits... you're delusional.
 
I'm all for user-replaceable batteries, but I'm all against regulation that dictates design.

If people really wanted user-replaceable batteries, that's what they would have purchased... manufacturers just make what sells.
That's really naive. Most users are uninformed, they don't know what they want, and usually what they want is not even what they need.

Manufacturers will lie to the users that you can't have water resistance with user replaceable batteries and or headphone jacks.
So then did the users really want non-replacable batteries? And proprietary wireless earphones costing hundreds instead of a wired one for $10?
No they bought into a lie that benefits the manufacturer.

Without legislation it is inevitable that the manufacturers will try to exploit users every which way possible.
 
The new regulations will also place requirements on how much recoverable materials are used in new batteries and suggest that the EU may ban non-rechargeable batteries altogether sometime after 2030.
This however is a bad idea. There are several use cases rechargable batteries are just not suitable for. Like a remote. Why would I buy rechargable batteries for it at 10x the cost when a normal battery lasts 10+ years in it? Outlasting the usefulness of the device in many cases.
 
I guess color me deluded, as I could not disagree more.

The only reason glued-in batteries became a thing is because Apple did it - the iPhone sold like crazy, and every other designer hopped on the me-too wagon for smart phones. Apple did it because it made manufacturing easier - the first iPhone wasn't water proof or anything, it just made it easier build (which allowed them to get a larger margin - they certainly didn't pass along those manufacturing savings)

There was no collusion - companies just followed the market. Granted, I think they followed the wrong thing - but it was still a case of the manufacturers just following the market there. No collusion to it, I can't imagine Apple colluding with any other manufacturer out there -- they very much march to the beat of their own drum, often to their own detriment.
 
I guess color me deluded, as I could not disagree more.

The only reason glued-in batteries became a thing is because Apple did it - the iPhone sold like crazy, and every other designer hopped on the me-too wagon for smart phones.

There was no collusion - companies just followed the market. Granted, I think they followed the wrong thing - but it was still a case of the manufacturers just following the market there. No collusion to it, I can't imagine Apple colluding with any other manufacturer out there -- they very much march to the beat of their own drum, often to their own detriment.
Apple did it under the pretence that you can't have water resistance otherwise, who do you think I was referring to? That wasn't a hypothetical scenario I was describing, that was history.

The other manufacturers saw that apple could get away with it so they followed suit. The users need the government to keep the manufacturers in check, and often that is not even enough due to the insane amount manufacturers spend on lobbyists spreading FUD.

Collusion is often unspoken, based on mutual understanding and not rocking the boat.
 
It was all about profiting on people not buying new batteries and getting a new phone and the absurd markup on making consumers pay them to replace batteries

There is no innovation in how poorly designed phones are now to repair much less replace the battery

Only there as a roadblock for $$$

Pretty much all Apple design is about making it as hard as possible to have the end user do anything without Apple being involved directly
 
As much as I like user-replaceable batteries, regulation is the wrong way to get them.

Don't go forgiving the poor means because you agree with the end - it will come back around to bite you on something you don't agree with.
 
As much as I like user-replaceable batteries, regulation is the wrong way to get them.

Don't go forgiving the poor means because you agree with the end - it will come back around to bite you on something you don't agree with.
Theres regulation and then theres stupid regulations. Laws and regulations are the basis of successful societies. Stupidity, inaction in the face of clear 'bad regulation' and too much corruption are the issues. Regulation for replaceable batteries are long long overdue. I would go one further and certain formats should be standardized and made like aa and such for long term applications ( not saying cylindrical just do size standards)
 
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As much as I like user-replaceable batteries, regulation is the wrong way to get them.

Don't go forgiving the poor means because you agree with the end - it will come back around to bite you on something you don't agree with.
We had them, until the mid 2010s most phones had user replacable batteries, the manufacturers took it away lead by apple to make the phones more throw away. How would you get them to offer it again if not through regulation?
 
The manufacturers took it away because people stopped buying them, not because Apple made them do it.
"Stopped buying them" that's such a disingenuous statement. How could you even suggest that when the choice was between the latest and greatest phone without replaceable battery and bottom shelf budget phones with much less features and slow rickety CPUs, that did have it?

As a side note proving that it wasn't a cost issue either when cheap phones had no problems offering it.

What's next? You'll say that phones got rid of sdcards slots also because users said: We don't want easy expandability, we'd rather buy a new phone when the space runs out?

How can one buy phones with replaceable batteries when it is not available in the latest models?
There was no cross-over period where they offered the most desirable models both with replaceable and soldered in battery.

Instead taking away user replaceable batteries was lauded as a premium feature, which conveniently enabled them to get rid of removable back covers also. Which until then allowed easier service and component replacement. But of course we can't have that, expandability, repairability and longevity are not on the menu, god forbid someone miss a product cycle and use the last model for two cycles! You are just supposed to buy product, and get excited for next product.

I never get angry over forum posts, but I swear this type of rhetoric is actually upsetting me.
 
Blackberry made smart phones in the late 00's/early 10's with SD Cards and exchangeable batteries - no one bought them. They started out the 00's as the king of the hill. They ended up becoming insignificant.

It's not like all the phone companies banded together and said "We are going to do this to screw over consumers - come on guys!".

They all said "Hold crap Apple is selling a sh*tload of phones and they did this, so we're going to copy it so we can continue to try to sell phones"

It all revolved around what people were buying. Yeah, the average consumer is an idiot - but they have cash and are putting it where they want it, so the market evolved to meet their demands.

If everyone started actually screaming for replaceable batteries, phones would come back out with them. But every time one does, it doesn't sell - you could say because they are sucky phones that try it - and it may well be - but it's also because consumers just don't prioritize a replaceable battery as a must-have feature.

Face it, folks like us are in the minority and our niche market isn't big enough to cater to.

Pushing regulation to require it - it's going to be a mistake. If you want better battery life in a phone with a sealed battery because you are afraid your battery is going to die while you need to use it, get a power bank - that's the same size and capacity as that spare battery you were going to carry around anyway. If you are wanting a replaceable battery because you are afraid the company is out to make you buy a new phone rather than replace an older battery -- well, you can already do that on every phone I know of (although it isn't necessarily easy and may require third parties), and you should be looking at supporting right-to-repair legistlation instead of this.
 
Problem is, as mentioned, the changes to make phones into disposable, fashionable item was coupled with the better cpu, with more memory, with better screens, with better cameras on and on and on. There was no real customer choice between. Black berry, nokia, htc, others fell behind in all kinds of ways.
 
How can one buy phones with replaceable batteries when it is not available in the latest models?
Exactly. I used to only buy phones with replaceable batteries, until they no longer became available. The last phone I actually paid money for (Galaxy Note 4) had a replaceable battery. My current phone (Galaxy A32) was given to me for free by T-Mobile cuz they took over the Sprint network and shut it down, and my Sprint-based Note 4 wasn't gonna work on the T-Mobile network. It does NOT have a replaceable battery. I'm not in the habit of complaining about free phones though.

I still only use phones with MicroSD slots. I will never ever buy a phone that does NOT have such a slot. I really f*cking wish replaceable batteries would come back though. Say what you want about regulation, but at least EU customers are getting their replaceable batteries back.
 
Blackberry made smart phones in the late 00's/early 10's with SD Cards and exchangeable batteries - no one bought them. They started out the 00's as the king of the hill. They ended up becoming insignificant.
Which has nothing to do with replacable batteries or expansion slots, and you know it.
It's not like all the phone companies banded together and said "We are going to do this to screw over consumers - come on guys!".
Nobody said that they did that.
They all said "Hold crap Apple is selling a sh*tload of phones and they did this, so we're going to copy it so we can continue to try to sell phones"
Apple was selling the phones in spite of it, not because of it. Huge difference. The rest saw that apple could get away with pissing on customers and telling them it is raining, so they joined in on the fun. Apple took a risk and it worked out in their favor, this is the free market at its worst.
It all revolved around what people were buying. Yeah, the average consumer is an idiot - but they have cash and are putting it where they want it, so the market evolved to meet their demands.
People bought it because they were told this is the price of new features like making it water resistant or slim. Which was a lie. It would be ideal to prevent them from lying, but I take the next best thing which is forcing them to do the right thing. Of course apple will come up with many new lies to weasel out of it, but if at least they are squirming that makes me happy.
If everyone started actually screaming for replaceable batteries, phones would come back out with them. But every time one does, it doesn't sell - you could say because they are sucky phones that try it - and it may well be - but it's also because consumers just don't prioritize a replaceable battery as a must-have feature.
That's exactly the point, it is not a product seller feature, but everyone who ever had their phone battery die wish they had it. People don't think ahead, you could sell them anything if it is presented in an appealing way, I mean the countless kickstarter scams that keep raking in millions are proof enough of that.
Face it, folks like us are in the minority and our niche market isn't big enough to cater to.
Just because users aren't screaming for something doesn't mean it shouldn't exist. There are plenty of things that people outright scream against yet it is mandated in their interest.
Pushing regulation to require it - it's going to be a mistake. If you want better battery life in a phone with a sealed battery because you are afraid your battery is going to die while you need to use it, get a power bank
A power bank is not an alternative to an easily replaceable battery.
- that's the same size and capacity as that spare battery you were going to carry around anyway.
Why would I carry around a second battery? No, this is not why we need it. You replace the battery when the original one has lost too much capacity.
If you are wanting a replaceable battery because you are afraid the company is out to make you buy a new phone rather than replace an older battery -- well, you can already do that on every phone I know of (although it isn't necessarily easy and may require third parties),
I'm not afraid they are out to make me buy a new phone, it is fact that they are. Of course they offer to replace the battery in an old phone at a precisely set price that is just high enough to make you consider buying the new model instead. Plus if you buy the new model you get it instantly, if you want the battery replaced in your old phone? That will take anywhere between days and weeks and they don't guarantee any data on it. I can't believe you think this little game is fair on their part. We used to just walk in to a store and buy a $20-30 battery for phones then pop it in right then and there. Now it costs $300 and you have to leave your phone at the shop.

and you should be looking at supporting right-to-repair legistlation instead of this.
I do, but if they can make phones as hard to open and repair as humanly possible at the same time then right to repair is worthless.
 
I agree with about 75% of what you said there Madmummy
 
I had to have a screen replacement for a previous Samsung phone a few years ago and to replace the screen, the entire phone had to be disassembled piece by piece from the back to the front. Every single sub-component had to be disconnected and removed.

Current cellphones are specifically designed to be thrown away and to buy a new one.

Regulation is unfortunately required to fix this **** and this is a good start.

As for Blackberry mentioned above - they had a small screen with limited apps. Removable batteries were not a factor in no-one buying them. The only reason people bought them at all is that they were required to by businesses. By the time Blackberry jumped on the big screen/touchscreen/support many apps/smartphone train it was too late.
 
The manufacturers took it away because people stopped buying them, not because Apple made them do it.

They took them away because they want to keep selling you new phones every two years. What better way to do so than to make it expensive and difficult to replace the battery?

This is a perfect example of something that can and should be regulated. Don't let the fact that some bad regulations exist cover up the fact that most regulations exist for a reason and are a positive.

I'm a huge believer in the free market, but the free market is not a panacea. Sometimes it needs a nudge to do the right thing. Competition will never drive improvement if there are no alternatives for people to choose from.

Non-replaceable batteries were a market manipulation to force people into spending more on new phones, plain and simple, and when all manufacturers colluded into doing it, people no longer had a choice, and thus the free market could never fix it.

I give Europe a huge atta-boy for this one, for taking market manipulations seriously and trying to do something about them. I hope some of it rubs off on us, as manufacturers are usually unwilling to design different versions for different markets unless they have to.
 
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