EVGA’s PowerLink Stabilizes the Power Going into Your GPU

Tsing

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EVGA has released an adapter for graphics cards called the PowerLink, which is supposed to provide more stable power than connecting a PSU directly to the GPU. The adapter filters and suppresses ripple and noise using two solid state capacitors.

According to EVGA's testing, the PowerLink can reduce voltage variation as much as 28%: "The 12V line going into graphics card without a PowerLink under load rates a Peak-to-Peak voltage of 1,008mV, while the 12V line going into the graphics card with a PowerLink is only 728mV."

The EVGA PowerLink has another function: to make your PC look even more awesome. This adapter allows you to reroute the power inputs for your graphics card, giving you improved case airflow, a lower profile height, and best of all, cleaner wiring setup. It even supports a unique configuration system allowing you to mix and match power input types to match your graphics card.
 
I've used some of the older PowerLink adapters just to make the cabling look better. Depending on how much they cost, I'd be in for one again.
 
these work on any video card then I take it?

They should. There is adjustment to the power connectors. They should definitely work for reference cards. Non-reference cards is anyone's guess. The version they put out for the GTX 1080 Ti era wouldn't work with my GIGABYTE RTX 2080 Ti Aorus Xtreme 11G.
 
They should. There is adjustment to the power connectors. They should definitely work for reference cards. Non-reference cards is anyone's guess. The version they put out for the GTX 1080 Ti era wouldn't work with my GIGABYTE RTX 2080 Ti Aorus Xtreme 11G.
so.. just Nvidia cards then or would they work on say .. a reference RX 5700XT?
 
whats in this thing? Special caps like we used to see on the ends of cables? im curious if its works on other cards as well?
 
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so.. just Nvidia cards then or would they work on say .. a reference RX 5700XT?

No idea. I honestly haven't looked at a reference AMD card up close in a very long time. The newest one I have is a Radeon HD 7970.
 
I remember seeing the older models and preferring their look over your standard PSU cable hanging off the side. I also thought they were only compatible with EVGA 10-series. Wish they would lose the giant 'EVGA' print off the side, though.

Not sure if it'd be compatible with my 2080 Gaming X Trio, and even if it was, I'd be worried about the cables getting too close to my front case fans or limiting myself to top only radiators.
 
I thought my PSU handled power delivery quite well. Marketing gimmick or actual benefit? Last I checked my 12V rail never flinched off 12 volts.
 
whats in this thing? Special caps like we used to see on the ends of cables? im curious if its works on other cards as well?
Looks like a couple capacitors and nicely routed PCB bus bar combinations. They refer to Solid State capacitors. From the picture they could be one a few types that have a solid dielectric. Maybe polymer caps.
 
I thought my PSU handled power delivery quite well. Marketing gimmick or actual benefit? Last I checked my 12V rail never flinched off 12 volts.
Check voltage where the power enters the gfx card when under heavy load.
You will need a scope to see fast changes, meters average out fast changes.
There will be variance due to voltage drop over the length of the cable and a small amount as the power supply keeps up with fast changing current demand.

This isnt about static current flow (ie static voltage), it is about rapidly changing current flow and the maximum voltage drop presented at the gfx card.
 
Outside of cable management I'd guess that the benefits of this would be dependent mostly on the quality of your power supply being used and considering this is marketed toward enthusiasts, a group of people who, for the most part, understand the importance of a good power supply I'm going to make the assumption that for most of us it's probably not necessary. That being said, we seem to like anything that helps us keep our systems clean and cables easily managed as long as the price isn't too ridiculous.
 
Outside of cable management I'd guess that the benefits of this would be dependent mostly on the quality of your power supply being used and considering this is marketed toward enthusiasts, a group of people who, for the most part, understand the importance of a good power supply I'm going to make the assumption that for most of us it's probably not necessary. That being said, we seem to like anything that helps us keep our systems clean and cables easily managed as long as the price isn't too ridiculous.
It is for people who want to extract the last bit of performance from their gfx card (and those who want a decent cable management solution).
Large and fast responding capacitors right where power enters the gfx card are the best solution.
You could solder caps on your card directly, if not there is this.
 
I remember seeing the older models and preferring their look over your standard PSU cable hanging off the side. I also thought they were only compatible with EVGA 10-series. Wish they would lose the giant 'EVGA' print off the side, though.

Not sure if it'd be compatible with my 2080 Gaming X Trio, and even if it was, I'd be worried about the cables getting too close to my front case fans or limiting myself to top only radiators.
Was wondering the same. I don't have a X Trio but I know that the 2080TI X Trio's have 3 power connectors(8+8+6). Does the 2080 have the same?

Pretty sure this only has two. Definitely not something for everyone. For some this can be a big benefit while others it could create more problems. The front end of my case is getting tight as well with the Strix 2080TI being as big as it is.
 
You could solder caps on your card directly, if not there is this.
Was actually reading some articles, watching some videos, last week about some people changing out such things from the PCB. A whole other level of modding and my hat is off to those with the skills and knowledge to do so. After the small fortune I put into my 2080TI I'd be far too nervous to go there. Took me around 3-4 months to pay off along with other toys.
 
I thought my PSU handled power delivery quite well. Marketing gimmick or actual benefit? Last I checked my 12V rail never flinched off 12 volts.


Unclear.

Most PSU's have some voltage droop at load and variation over time. GPU makes know this and have circuits to deal with it on board.

It is unclear to me if this would actually provide any benefit or if it is only a gimmick.
 
Unclear.

Most PSU's have some voltage droop at load and variation over time. GPU makes know this and have circuits to deal with it on board.

It is unclear to me if this would actually provide any benefit or if it is only a gimmick.
I think it's only capacitors so voltage droop (long term IR drop) might actually be slightly worse. It might help with load variation, and should help with noise and ripple. Then again I am only guessing, would be interesting to see a good review done.
 
If it's just a few bucks and they have them for different power needs... not some universal 1 size fits all that never works quite right... I'd be interested.
 
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