GIGABYTE Shifts All Connectors to the Back of the Motherboard with Project Stealth

Tsing

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GIGABYTE has shared a press release detailing Project Stealth, a new specially designed collection of PC components including a special motherboard that attempts to eliminate "the headaches of cable clutter, installation challenges, and obstructed airflow" by shifting all of the usual connectors to the back of the board.

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Seen this a while ago. It would certainly be a nice change for cleaner builds.
 
It's not just about a cleaner build, but the fact that this design could eliminate a lot of pain points as the guy in the video touches on. You run all your wiring on the back of the motherboard tray anyway. It only makes sense to have the connectors back there if it all possible. Additionally, things like the 8-pin power connectors for the CPU are almost always a huge pain to deal with even in some extra large cases. Moving the CMOS battery to the back is also a nice touch.

Like the built-in I/O shield, the second I saw this I had to wonder why it took this long for someone to come up with this, and why we haven't been doing this for a decade or more.
 
It's not just about a cleaner build, but the fact that this design could eliminate a lot of pain points as the guy in the video touches on. You run all your wiring on the back of the motherboard tray anyway. It only makes sense to have the connectors back there if it all possible. Additionally, things like the 8-pin power connectors for the CPU are almost always a huge pain to deal with even in some extra large cases. Moving the CMOS battery to the back is also a nice touch.

Like the built-in I/O shield, the second I saw this I had to wonder why it took this long for someone to come up with this, and why we haven't been doing this for a decade or more.
Correct, but in the end the thing most people will notice and like is a way cleaner build. Hopefully other manufacturers are able to follow suit with something like this.
 
Only downside I see is needing a case specifically designed for this.

Be nice to see this become a standard.
Yea this actually. Case builders would love this because diy people would be all over it and buying new cases slash motherboard trays. Me.. I'd just get out a Dremel tool if needed.
 
But more importantly ... how well does this motherboard perform? It's one thing to look good, and another to perform well.
 
Only downside I see is needing a case specifically designed for this.
I have a Dremel, and many other tools, sharp and not so much, that I'd be willing to apply to a case to fit one of these. It would not be the first time I've... "abused" a personal case to fit hardware. Obviously review cases are reviewed as delivered ;).



Only downside to this I can see is that all power supply and most fan cables (and any other cables) are sized for having to be run through the motherboard tray and be plugged in to all those awkward upward-facing connectors.

That leaves a lot of slack on the backside of the motherboard - you can certainly go to town bundling them all up, but in addition to motherboard manufacturers potentially following Gigabyte's idea / lead here, you then of course have cases that need revisions, and you'll probably want to look at power supplies with appropriately shortened cables. And then the GPU with the power on the bottom - which assumes that the GPU is longer than the motherboard, and is installed directly into a PCIe slot, i.e. without a riser cable or riser board.

It's a lot of variables covering a lot of industries to cover, and you'd pretty much need all of it to happen at once to take advantage of the benefits.
 
I have a Dremel, and many other tools, sharp and not so much, that I'd be willing to apply to a case to fit one of these. It would not be the first time I've... "abused" a personal case to fit hardware. Obviously review cases are reviewed as delivered ;).



Only downside to this I can see is that all power supply and most fan cables (and any other cables) are sized for having to be run through the motherboard tray and be plugged in to all those awkward upward-facing connectors.

That leaves a lot of slack on the backside of the motherboard - you can certainly go to town bundling them all up, but in addition to motherboard manufacturers potentially following Gigabyte's idea / lead here, you then of course have cases that need revisions, and you'll probably want to look at power supplies with appropriately shortened cables. And then the GPU with the power on the bottom - which assumes that the GPU is longer than the motherboard, and is installed directly into a PCIe slot, i.e. without a riser cable or riser board.

It's a lot of variables covering a lot of industries to cover, and you'd pretty much need all of it to happen at once to take advantage of the benefits.
Or you know go to cablemods and just order cables pinned for your power supply at the appropriate lengths.
 
Oh I see, it's a whole complete system. Time will tell if DIY parts will do this in the future, but if so, likely to involve new case designs.... or handy work with a dremel.

I like the video card with power on the bottom too. I have always thought the top mounted power wires were dumb and ugly... and cards just want more and more.
 
But more importantly ... how well does this motherboard perform? It's one thing to look good, and another to perform well.
I don't know but what a pain in the *** it would be to test. I'd have to figure out some way of doing that unless I got a compatible case with the review sample.
 
The Linus video is funny. He starts out all impressed but then he starts putting it together..... He discovers cables won't reach, plugs don't fit right, and there is like zero airflow. Fast forward to 14 min mark for his thermal "solution". Hey at least it worked :unsure:
 
Me.. I'd just get out a Dremel tool if needed.
Literally my first thought when someone mentioned too bad you need a case specifically made for this.

Form factors and standards never bothered me much.
 
Literally my first thought when someone mentioned too bad you need a case specifically made for this.

Form factors and standards never bothered me much.
I am not a hack. I prefer to use properly engineered things over crap I cut up with a dremel.
 
I am not a hack. I prefer to use properly engineered things over crap I cut up with a dremel.
You waste your money on whatever you want. I'd rather whip out the dremel than my wallet.

I'm not buying a new PSU, or case, or anything because one screw hole is misaligned. I make it work, exactly because I'm an engineer.

I designed and built mobile platforms for devices that cost $20-500k, so I think I can handle a dremel "properly"
 
Meh, not a fan of the idea. All for looks and yet they'll just make it more of a pain to setup or troubleshoot problems. This also doesn't give mobo makers much flexibility in placement of components on a board.

Edit: Heh, drilling the front face while the machine is running. I really hate these blocked front cases all done for looks.
 
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Literally my first thought when someone mentioned too bad you need a case specifically made for this.

Form factors and standards never bothered me much.
Yea I watched the LTT video and was actually bothered when he decided to shave on the connector rather than fix the case. Makes me think the case was on loan and he wasn't allowed to mess with it.
 
Yea I watched the LTT video and was actually bothered when he decided to shave on the connector rather than fix the case. Makes me think the case was on loan and he wasn't allowed to mess with it.

Eh, given what he does at 14mins I think it was more he was lazy and didn't want to take off the mobo a second time so he just shaved some plastic off the connector.
 
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