What is your favorite General Benchmarking software?

IceDigger

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What is your favorite General Benchmarking software?

I'm looking for something good that is also portable.
 

Dan_D

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What are you trying to do with it? What kind of information / stress testing are you looking to do?
 

IceDigger

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Mainly for stressing out components to see if they are performing correctly.
 

Dan_D

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Which ones? For the most part, you can stress what you need to with ASUS Realbench or Prime95. You can at least hit the CPU and RAM hard that way. For GPU's you'll need to run something else. Tests like 3D Mark can stress a bit of everything, but stuff like that doesn't hit the CPU and RAM hard enough to generate a significant enough heat load or use enough RAM to be of value.
 

alxlwson

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When the heck did Underwriter's Laboratory buy Futuremark?!
 

Peter_Brosdahl

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When the heck did Underwriter's Laboratory buy Futuremark?!
I don't know but I only noticed UL listed on one of the pages about three months ago when I was doing some updated tests on my 2080TI. I seriously did like five takes looking at it and thinking 'huh?'. Can't say I'd ever have expected them to branch out in that direction.
 

alxlwson

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I don't know but I only noticed UL listed on one of the pages about three months ago when I was doing some updated tests on my 2080TI. I seriously did like five takes looking at it and thinking 'huh?'. Can't say I'd ever have expected them to branch out in that direction.

I noticed it a couple weeks ago when I was speccing a Dell gaming laptop for a buddy's son. They broke the FPS/games for each laptop config, and it said data provided by UL. Then I went searching the other day for old 3DM stuff and saw UL was all over the page.
 

Peter_Brosdahl

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@alxlwson

I thought about creating a new thread for this and feel free to if you think it's worth it. Our conversation got me wondering about UL and benchmarking too. A little looking and found this.

Many of us who grew up in the the 60's-80's are extremely familiar with the name Underwriters Laboratories or UL. They were usually, synonymously, associated with safe product verification. We usually knew if we saw a UL stamp on a toaster, microwave, or other household appliance that it was safe to use and often if we heard a story of a recall or something catching on fire that it was something that didn't get approved by them. No one is perfect but by far they were the gold standard for such things. How surprising was it that recently we've begun to see their logo on some our favorite benchmarking software. How did that happen and when?

From Anandtech. https://www.anandtech.com/show/8699/ul-acquires-futuremark-expanding-into-benchmarking-services

"Earlier this week, in something of an unexpected move, UL (Underwriters Laboratories) and Futuremark announced that UL had acquired the benchmarking company, signaling their expansion into the software development industry and benchmarking services. This might seem a bit of an odd fit at first, as UL is a large corporation that's more than a century old and they have a history of providing "safety science" – they certify, validate, test, inspect, audit, and advise consumers and businesses in matters of safety. Reading further into the announcement however clarifies things:"

"Embedded software is now an important part of product design. With an increased focus on mobility, we see more and more products being connected, making the Internet of Things a reality. Consequently, software quality is a significant driver of product safety and performance; and we believe that benchmarking is an important way to help our customers to improve the performance of their products. This acquisition provides [UL] with an opportunity to build a new business line in testing a wide variety of technological devices so they offer the performance, safety and privacy that consumers expect."

From Futuremark. https://benchmarks.ul.com/news/futuremark-benchmarks-moving-to-ul-com

"You may remember reading that Futuremark became part of UL in November 2014. "
"Later this year, we'll take the next step in our integration with UL. Over the coming months, we will be moving our websites and online services to a new home at benchmarks.UL.com. "

And finally from Techgage on April 11, 2018. https://techgage.com/news/futuremark-changing-name-to-ul-launches-new-website/

"Today, Futuremark has announced that its merging with UL is effectively complete, and soon, its name will go away in lieu of UL. Going forward, we’ll refer to 3DMark as “UL 3DMark” rather than “Futuremark 3DMark”. In all respects, the Futuremark name is done, done, done. And, I consider it a bit of a pity. The name is forward-thinking, incredibly apt for a company that makes benchmarks to help us gauge future content demands. UL 3DMark doesn’t quite have the same amount of punch to it. "


There you have it. A little history on how a company that started out in 1894 that became the safety testing standard has reinvented itself again over a hundred years later into a staple of the PC community.
 
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